Sunday, March 16, 2014

geekerrific:

cyberteeth:

Chimamamda Ngozi Adiche, We Should All Be Feminists

The most powerful thing anyone has ever said to me: “You deserve to take up space.” 

(Source: babyghosts)

Sunday, March 2, 2014

gradientlair:

The hashtag #WhiteFeministRants was started by @RaniaKhalek in response to The Nation piece on “toxic feminism”, a piece that purposely obscured structural power differences and racism within feminism as to why the responses (to various stunts by White feminists) from women of colour do not always have a “nice tone” and are thereby deemed “toxic.” I previously posted about that article and shared an important quote from another response piece to that article. The tweets I sent above were specific to Black women and experiences with mainstream feminism because that’s my experience as a Black woman, but of course Black women aren’t the only ones repeatedly marginalized in these daily hit pieces, within feminism and within society itself. But the role of anti-Blackness within such friction cannot be denied either. 

If we’re going to have an honest conversation about problems in feminism (which simply reflects White supremacist capitalist cisheteropatriarchy itself, “feminist” label or not) but cannot discuss why some womanists/Black feminists, women of colour who are feminists, trans women, sex workers, poor women, disabled women etc. respond to these hit pieces and structural exclusion and oppression because of White Feminism/mainstream feminism's proximity to the State and distance from the oppressed, then things like what I mentioned in the tweets above (which is not really hyperbole…at all) need to be included in claims of “toxicity.”

I do not randomly tweet White women. Other than a handful who are kind to me, I don’t talk to too many online about topics of any significance. I don’t have any White women friends offline because of the abuse I experienced at their hands in high school, college, grad school, a decade of corporate America and social groups/gatherings/in public. So I am not running around planning to be “toxic” to White women or White feminists specifically. I don’t troll them or anyone online. Sometimes I discuss their harmful work and I don’t always tweet them directly. I focus on my life and my work, but that work includes deconstructing racism and how this (among many other identity facets) differentiates how we experience gender. And racism amidst feminism does not get a pass nor am I doing so because I want some kinda “White approval” that they deny me. So this idea that I could ever talk about it “too much” or should ignore it and grin, smile and tap dance for White feminists is an idea that will not ever be valid to me.

Oh and by the way, when they’re saying things like what I mentioned in my tweets above—reinforcing White supremacist narratives and norms about Black women as feminists, mothers, writers etc.—that stuff hurts. I understand that Whites think that Black people—especially Black women—do not experience pain in the way Whites do or at all (as actual research has confirmed their thoughts), that is actually a White supremacist lie with centuries of history used to justify the dehumanization of Black people. These things hurt. And while their “feelings” get “hurt” by critiques that I make of their racist, White supremacist, anti-intersectional, purposely obscuring structural power type of pieces, planning and action, their lies about who I am as a Black woman threatens my life. There is no “both sides” that “goes both ways” when one “side” has White supremacy—which they do not use their feminism to deconstruct—supporting them. 

Related Essay List: 2013: A Year Of White Supremacy and Racism In Mainstream Feminism

Saturday, February 1, 2014

readabookson:

The Trouble Between Us: An Uneasy History of White and Black Women in the Feminist Movement

https://anonfiles.com/file/877975186837dbbbcd57d841ffe5c26e

Segregated Sisterhood: Racism Politics American Feminism

https://anonfiles.com/file/bbe6cc9f05335a8144fa0be2098a06e8

Black Sexual Politics: African Americans, Gender, and the New Racism

https://anonfiles.com/file/6923ebcd172d45425d86da18c1926644

Black Feminist Thought: Knowledge, Consciousness, and the Politics of Empowerment

https://anonfiles.com/file/b4994a81e4c9747e42e1d5209e206dae

Ain’t I a Woman: Black Women and Feminism

https://anonfiles.com/file/81b95aa8e335602d1627e178361c8a72

Feminism Is For Everybody: Passionate Politics

https://anonfiles.com/file/5a31a895c6f4d226dd0ef07f88c8cbfd

The Womanist Reader: The First Quarter Century of Womanist Thought

https://anonfiles.com/file/dd9f429a320aab3076764568ae9be545

Black Feminist Voices in Politics

https://anonfiles.com/file/fb475479b90b47a6eebaf426840c9a29

Living for the Revolution: Black Feminist Organizations, 1968–1980

https://anonfiles.com/file/22aa61fc8933bb1dd59539d6a2662720

Tuesday, September 10, 2013